Composers

Adolf Friedrich Hesse

Organ
Piano
Piano four hands
Pump organ
Voice
Soprano
Alto
Tenor
Bass
Mixed chorus
Prelude
Fantasia
Fugue
Postlude
Variation
Chorale
Religious music
Trio
Andantino
Piece
by alphabet
Fantasie für die Orgel zu 4 Händen, Op.35Fantasia in D minor, Op.87Leichte Präludien für die OrgelOrgel-Vorspiele, Op.33Orgel-Vorspiele, Op.32Hesse-Album3 Präludien, 1 Postludium, 1 Fugue und 1 variirten Choral, Op.37Praeludium 'Dies irae'Organ Introduction to Graun's Tod Jesu, Op.843 Präludien, 1 Trio und 1 Fantasie für das Konzert, Op.36Variationen über ein original Thema, Op.342 Fugen nebst Einleitung, Op.39Variationen über ein original Thema, Op.47Hesse albumOrgel-Vorspiele verschiedenen Charakters, Op.48Rondo No.3, Op.68Andantino for OrganSinget dem Herrn, Op.61String Quartet No.1, Op.23Symphony No.3, Op.55
Wikipedia
Adolf Friedrich Hesse (30 August 1809 – 5 August 1863) was a German organist and composer.
Hesse was born and died in Breslau. He studied in his hometown with the organists Friedrich Wilhelm Berner and Ernst Köhler. He was taught within the Bach tradition of Silesia. On his first concert tour in Germany he met the organist Christian Heinrich Rinck, with whom he returned to study for six months in 1828-1829: Rinck was a student of Johann Christian Kittel, who in turn was a student of Johann Sebastian Bach. In 1831, he became the principal organist at the Bernhardinerkirche in Breslau. Considered one of the most important organists in Germany, his virtuosic playing and agile pedalwork dazzled audiences in Paris, where he played an all-Bach programme—a novelty in France—for the inauguration of the organ at Saint-Eustache in 1844; and in London, where he played at Crystal Palace during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Back in Breslau, he conducted the symphonic concerts of the city's Opera Orchestra. One of Hesse's pupils was the Belgian organist Jacques-Nicolas Lemmens, who would later teach Alexandre Guilmant and Charles-Marie Widor.
Dates of publication with publisher where known. Os. = "Orgelsachen"