Violin Solo
Violin + ...
For beginners
Composers

Alt-Wiener Tanzweisen

Composer: Kreisler Fritz

Instruments: Violin Piano

Tags: Dance

#Arrangements

Download free scores:

Complete. Complete Score PDF 0 MBComplete. Violin Part PDF 0 MB
Selections. 2. Liebesleid - Complete Score PDF 0 MB
Selections. 2. Liebesleid - Complete Score PDF 0 MBSelections. 2. Liebesleid - Violin Part PDF 0 MB
Selections. 3. Schön Rosmarin - Complete Score PDF 0 MBSelections. 3. Schön Rosmarin - Violin Part PDF 0 MB
Selections. 2. Liebesleid. Complete Score PDF 1 MBSelections. 2. Liebesleid. Violin Part PDF 1 MB
Selections. 3. Schön Rosmarin: Complete Score PDF 0 MBSelections. 3. Schön Rosmarin: Violin Part PDF 0 MB
Selections. 1. Liebesfreud: Complete Score PDF 2 MBSelections. 1. Liebesfreud: Violin Part PDF 0 MB
Selections. 1. Liebesfreud (simplified version) PDF 0 MB

Arrangements:

Other

Liebesfreud and Liebesleid (Nos.1, 2). Piano (Sergei Rachmaninoff)Schön Rosmarin (No.3). Piano (Kirsch, Alexander)Liebesleid (No.2). Piano (Unknown)Liebesfreud (No.1). Brass instrument (Wayne Beardwood)Liebesfreud (No.1). Saxophone(7) (Larocque, Jacques)Liebesleid (No.2). Saxophone(7) (Larocque, Jacques)Schön Rosmarin (No.3). Saxophone(7) (Larocque, Jacques)
Wikipedia
Alt-Wiener Tanzweisen (Old Viennese Melodies in German) is a set of three short pieces for violin and piano, written by Fritz Kreisler. The three pieces are usually performed or heard separately, and are titled Liebesfreud (Love's Joy), Liebesleid (Love's Sorrow), and Schön Rosmarin (Lovely Rosemary).
It is not known when he wrote them, but they were published in 1905, deliberately misattributed to Joseph Lanner. They had become parts of Kreisler's repertoire well before September 1910, when he copyrighted them under his own name.
Kreisler often played these pieces as encores at his concerts. In 1911, he published his own piano solo arrangements of them as Alt-Wiener Tanzweisen. They have appeared in numerous settings for other instruments, or orchestrated.
Two of them, Liebesfreud and Liebesleid, were the subject of virtuoso transcriptions for solo piano by Kreisler's friend Sergei Rachmaninoff (1931), who also recorded these transcriptions.